Are there any words without a meaning?

From Geoffrey Hunter’s Metalogic, p.5:

… a thing is an English word only if it has meaning.

It got me thinking: is this really so? Is it possible for there to be an English word that is absolutely void of meaning, i.e. meaningless?

Can I not come up with a word on my own, and not give it any meaning whatsoever? Do made-up words enter the “gates of English” if and only if they have meaning?

P.S. I don’t know if this question is more suitable for Linguistics.SE (or, perhaps, Philosophy.SE under the ‘philosophy_of_language’ tag?), since I am interested in an answer for natural languages in general as well. I have focused on English probably because the book I’m reading is in English, the statement was made by a native speaker of English, and English is the language I am most familiar with.

Answer

Do made-up words enter the “gates of English” if and only if they have meaning?

No.

Nonsense words exist, put to good effect in Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky”:

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Etc.

They are words, but they mean nothing. And the sum of them make a delightful nonsense poem.

Furthermore, in linguistics, there are many words that linguists deem mean nothing.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Michael Smith , Answer Author : anongoodnurse

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