As… as: what does the latter do?

“As” is a frequently used word in English and has many parts of speech including preposition, adverb and conjunction.

Here are two sentence which both have used the phrase “as…as”:

1) You’re as tall as your father.

2) I have as much confidence in you as in him.

It is apparent that the former “as” in both sentence is an adverb. But what’s the part of speech of the latter? A preposition in sentence 1 and a conjunction in sentence 2? Does it mean the latter “as” in this phrase has no fixed function, and its part of speech depends on the context of the sentence?

And one more question: What is the part of speech of “as” in this sentence: We demonstrate that she is the murder as indicated by the knife with her blood.

Thank you!

Answer

1) You’re as tall as your father.

2) I have as much confidence in you as in him.

The first as in each sentence is indeed an adverb. The second as in each sentence is a preposition. In A student’s introduction to English grammar 2005, Huddleston & Pullum write:

The second as is a preposition like than. As is used for equality, and than for inequality. (p. 200)

In most modern grammars, prepositions can take many different types of complements, for example noun phrases or clauses. For this reason we do not need to give the word as different parts of speech in examples (1) and (2).

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : sdasd tont , Answer Author : Araucaria – Not here any more.

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