being usages dilemma

I’ve read in BBC that we use use “being” as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kind of usage, What I want to learn here is about “preposition+verb-ing” form of usage.It has been said that “being+past particle” here is functioning as nouns. But I don’t know what kind of meanings it would conveys. So,The following are two examples from BBC

  1. I look forward to being interviewed on the current affairs programme. ( what does “being interviewed” mean? )
  2. She was afraid of being accused of a crime which she did not commit. (What does” being accused of” mean ?)
    Learning English | BBC World Service
    I think the following are also the examples of “preposition+verb-ing”:
    -John talks about being helped by a stranger. (Does it mean -john talks about that he was helped by a stranger.)

-Before being moved to an apartment, he lived in a hostel.
(Does it mean “Before he was moved to……..)

-Despite being helped by nurse,he slepped and fell. (Does it mean- despite he was helped by nurse ,……..)

-What is the risk of being killed in war ? (Does it mean–what is the risk of killing in a war ?)

-What are the chances of being killed by a falling tree ? (Does it mean: what are the chances of killing in a war?)

-Share your experiences of being helped by a teacher. (Does it mean: share your experiences when you were helped by a stranger ?)

I am looking forward to him being interviewed vs I am looking forward him to be interviewed. Are these sentences same, if not what is the difference ??

I’m really confused.

Please explain me the meaning and usage of “being+past particle” when we use with “preposition” ?

Answer

A form of be with a past participle is the normal way of forming a passive in English.

So being interviewed is the -ing form of be interviewed, which is the passive of interview.

I look forward to being interviewed means roughly the same as I look forward to somebody interviewing me.

She was afraid of being accused of a crime which she did not commit means roughly the same as She was afraid of somebody accusing her of a crime which she did not commit.

I am looking forward to him being interviewed (which most people regard as grammatical, though some complain that him should be his in that construction) means something very different from I am looking forward to being interviewed; because that last sentence means that it is me that is going to be interviewed.

I am looking forward him to be interviewed is not grammatical, because looking forward to cannot take an infinitive clause. This is not predictable from its meaning: it just happens to be an arbitrary fact about it. The word expect, which has a meaning somewhat similar to look forward (though not exactly the same) can take a to-infinitive clause, so I am expecting him to be interviewed is grammatical. (Note that to plays a different role in the two cases: with looking forward it is a preposition introducing the complement of the adjectival phrase. With expect it introduces a to-infinitive).

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : concurrencyboy , Answer Author : Colin Fine

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