What’s so funny about “You are winner”? [closed]

Closed. This question is opinion-based. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it can be answered with facts and citations by editing this post. Closed 7 years ago. Improve this question I came across one slang thing: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=You%27re%20Winner! While understand that it is grammatically incorrect and you … Read more

this “something” thing

How can we explain the use of this “something” thing? I understand it, and I might even use it, but I’m having trouble putting my finger on what it conveys. I’ve provided two examples below: Example 1 Ivan: How’s it going Dan? Dan: Not bad. Super busy these days with this whole tea thing. Ivan: … Read more

“The man in glasses” or “The man with glasses”? [closed]

Closed. This question is off-topic. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it’s on-topic for English Language & Usage Stack Exchange. Closed 6 years ago. Improve this question The man in glasses or The man with glasses Is it grammatically correct to say with or in glasses? … Read more

Differences between formal and colloquial English? [closed]

Closed. This question needs to be more focused. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it focuses on one problem only by editing this post. Closed 5 years ago. Improve this question What are the basic differences between formal and colloquial English? Is it right that colloquial … Read more

Is there a specific word or phrase for the drowsiness one might feel soon after a heavy lunch?

After a lunch, especially a nutritionally dense one, one might drift off into a drowsy state, sort of a “I sure could use a nap” feel, likely due to the breaking down of the foods in the digestive tract. Is there a specific, common word or phrase for that drowsy feel/condition? Example of a relatively … Read more

“people aged from 15 to 24” vs “people ages from 15 to 24”: which is grammatically correct?

Here is a sentence excerpted from an APA psychological research paper, Teen suicide is a growing health concern. It is the third-leading cause of death for young people ages 15 to 24, surpassed only by homicide and accidents, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. I’ve heard people use both “people aged … Read more