Which one is correct? “Explain what this is?” or “Explain what is this?”

Please explain what is this? or Please explain what this is? Which one is grammatically correct? Answer Your sentence, despite ending with a question mark (a period would be more correct), is an imperative sentence: “(You) please explain…” Therefore, the noun comes before the verb and you say “Please explain what this is.” AttributionSource : … Read more

Should I use ‘gotten’ or ‘got’ in this sentence?

I think ‘got’ sounds better, but I’d rather my sentence be correct than pretty. My sentence: The things she’d told him couldn’t be got out of her by just anyone. Is ‘got’ correct or should I use ‘gotten’? Answer The things she had told him couldn’t be got out of her by just anyone. It … Read more

He suggested that our team have a meeting vs. he suggested that our team has a meeting

My team’s boss suggested that our team should have a meeting with another team. We are currently trying to write a message to the other team but cannot come to a conclusion as to how to write a particular sentence. Here are the two sentences we are torn between Our boss suggested that our team … Read more

fall behind with or on

When we use “fall behind with” and “fall behind on”? I mean when we use that verb with “with” and when we use with “on”? He was ill for six weeks and fell behind with his schoolwork. I’ve fallen behind on the mortgage payments. are both sentences above correct? Answer Oxford Learners Dictionaries says they … Read more

“Further the goal”: is this use correct?

Does the word “Further” fit naturally in the following sentence? “The modern thinkers believe that by attracting the young generation towards museums, the management furthers the fundamental goal of the museums which is to educate the masses about their history.” Here I want to say that the goal of the museums is to educate the … Read more

Neither Alex nor Ali can achieve his/her dream Vs Neither Alex nor Ali can achieve them dream

Which is the correct one of these two examples? I tried to say no one of them can achieve his or her own dream. Neither Alex nor Ali can achieve his/her dream Neither Alex nor Ali can achieve them dream Answer Neither Alex nor Ali can achieve their dream. If they are unsuccessfully pursuing a … Read more

“Do you have any wine left?” Is this “have something done” or the past participle form of leave as an attributive

In the sentence “Do you have any wine left?” I think left is the past participle form of the verb “leave” and it is now an adjective. Am I right? Answer You are right. We can use past participle as adjective. For example, I am excited. About the question in the title, I think the … Read more

Is it mandatory to use contractions in tag questions and the like?

Example 1: The weather is hot, isn’t it? vs.: The weather is hot, is it not? Example 2: Aren’t you going to study tonight? vs.: Are you not going to study tonight? Apart from convenience in pronuncation, how do the above versions differ (contraction vs. full form)? Answer It’s just extremely common to see tag … Read more