final letter “y”, following a vowel, yet representing another syllable

Is there a word in English, in which the final letter “y”, while following a vowel, would represent another syllable? For example, in the words “worry”, “story”, “sassy” the final letter “y” stands for one syllable (wo-rry, sto-ry, sa-ssy), but it doesn’t follow a vowel. On the other hand, in such words like “boy”, “say”, … Read more

“Constructor” pronunciation debate [closed]

Closed. This question is off-topic. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it’s on-topic for English Language Learners Stack Exchange. Closed 4 months ago. Improve this question I have a debate with my friend on the pronunciation of “constructor” word that he claims there cannot be a … Read more

Teacher pronunciations — /ˈtiː.tʃə(r)/ and /ˈtiː.tʃɚ/

Why Cambridge English dictionary gives two pronunciations for “teacher” and Lexico gives only one? Teacher (CED): /ˈtiː.tʃər/ and /ˈtiː.tʃɚ/ Teacher (Lexico): Only /ˈtiːtʃə/ Does teacher have two pronunciations? Answer In non-rhotic1 varieties of English (Standard Southern British English here), ‘teacher’ on it’s own is pronounced /ˈtiː.tʃə/. However, when it’s followed by another word beginning with … Read more

Why ‘TEFL” is pronounced with Schwa /tef.əl/ although it’s an abbreviation? [closed]

Closed. This question is opinion-based. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it can be answered with facts and citations by editing this post. Closed 4 months ago. Improve this question Why ‘TEFL” is pronounced with Schwa /tef.əl/ although it’s an abbreviation? What is the logic behind … Read more

Pronunciation of the word “restaurant”

How should the word “restaurant” be pronounced in BrE? Does the “t” in the end give a sound?I know that in Cambridge Dictionary “t” is written in the transcription, however, I heard the opinion that it can be silent in “restaurant”. Answer AttributionSource : Link , Question Author : Marie Mit , Answer Author : … Read more

What are the key phonetic differences between British English and Australian English?

Due to historic reasons, they are somewhat similar (for example, both British and Australian speakers usually pronounce ‘a’ in words like ‘hat’ as [a] instead of [æ] as Americans would do). However, they sound distinctly different, but it’s hard for me to point out those differences exactly. Would you do that? Answer AttributionSource : Link … Read more

The reading of the word

I’m interested in the next information. Is it possible to read the word ‘via’ [‘vaɪə] like a latin variant [‘vɪə] in English? Answer AttributionSource : Link , Question Author : Tymiya , Answer Author : Community