final letter “y”, following a vowel, yet representing another syllable

Is there a word in English, in which the final letter “y”, while following a vowel, would represent another syllable? For example, in the words “worry”, “story”, “sassy” the final letter “y” stands for one syllable (wo-rry, sto-ry, sa-ssy), but it doesn’t follow a vowel. On the other hand, in such words like “boy”, “say”, … Read more

Reason or rule for pronunciations [closed]

Closed. This question needs to be more focused. It is not currently accepting answers. Want to improve this question? Update the question so it focuses on one problem only by editing this post. Closed 11 months ago. Improve this question I am not a native English speaker and I am learning English. Sometimes I will … Read more

French letters in English

The English language has a great amount of borrowings from French. But why aren’t such letters as “ç”(façade) and “é”(café, protégé) changed if they don’t exist in the English alphabet and there are “c” and “e” only? Also I have a question about the surname Brontë (I mean Charlotte Brontë). Again English doesn’t have a … Read more

Teacher pronunciations — /ˈtiː.tʃə(r)/ and /ˈtiː.tʃɚ/

Why Cambridge English dictionary gives two pronunciations for “teacher” and Lexico gives only one? Teacher (CED): /ˈtiː.tʃər/ and /ˈtiː.tʃɚ/ Teacher (Lexico): Only /ˈtiːtʃə/ Does teacher have two pronunciations? Answer In non-rhotic1 varieties of English (Standard Southern British English here), ‘teacher’ on it’s own is pronounced /ˈtiː.tʃə/. However, when it’s followed by another word beginning with … Read more

What are the key phonetic differences between British English and Australian English?

Due to historic reasons, they are somewhat similar (for example, both British and Australian speakers usually pronounce ‘a’ in words like ‘hat’ as [a] instead of [æ] as Americans would do). However, they sound distinctly different, but it’s hard for me to point out those differences exactly. Would you do that? Answer AttributionSource : Link … Read more

What can be a possible reason for phonological changes in English?

I was reading this Wikipedia article. It is describing the major phonological changes in English over a period of time but no reason is given for any changes. Kindly correct me if I am wrong, the changes occurred because majority of people started to use some other phonetics and due to this the phonological changes … Read more

Why does “don’t be” sometimes sound like “dombe”?

Why does “don’t be” sometimes become “DOMBE”? There is no M in the spelling then why? Answer Short answer Some people pronounce Don’t be as dombe because the t is sometimes deleted and the n is assimilated to an m in anticipation of the following b. Explanation In Don’t be, the /t/ is flanked by … Read more

What is the intonation pattern of the sentence?

What is the intonation pattern of the sentence at 0:13 around in the clip? Does it go like this? Moreover, does the intonation of the speakers in the clip sound like a normal daily conversation that native English speakers would utter? Or, could they be a bit more stressed or higher-pitched on some words cause … Read more

breath and breathe?

what is the phonological change that caused the voicing alternation / difference between the words breath and breathe? word-final devoicing intervocalic voicing Answer To the extent that it’s reliable, a section in the Wikipedia article about Middle English phonology says In Old English, [v], [ð], [z] were allophones of /f/, /θ/, /s/, respectively, occurring between … Read more

Why does “don’t be” sometimes sound like “dombe”?

Why does “don’t be” sometimes become “DOMBE”? There is no M in the spelling then why? Answer Short answer Some people pronounce Don’t be as dombe because the t is sometimes deleted and the n is assimilated to an m in anticipation of the following b. Explanation In Don’t be, the /t/ is flanked by … Read more