What is the everyday term for “a piece of dried mucus from the corners of your eyes, which we often have in the early morning after getting up”?

It seems that “Rheum” is the technical word to express a thin mucus naturally discharged from the eyes, nose, or mouth, often during sleep (cf. mucopurulent discharge) Dried rheum is commonly called sleep,[4] sleepy-seeds,[5] sleepy buds,[5] sleepy sand, sleepies, eye boogers, eye crust, eye goop, sleep dust, [6] or sleepy dirt. Among those words, which … Read more

Is it correct and natural to say “come on the time you do something” when you really want someone to do something?

Could you tell me if it is correct and natural to say come on the time you do something when you really want someone to do something? For example: Come on the time you come and we go on a trip together. If it’s not something a native English speaker would say, then what would … Read more

“I have been injured in the last two months” vs “…for the last two months” vs “…the last two months”

Do you think all three of these sentences correct and interchangeable? I am not sure if they are all correct. “I have been injured in the last two months” “I have been injured for the last two months” “I have been injured the last two months” Context: I was injured two months ago, and I … Read more

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Do you think it is correct to say Half a loaf of bread Half a banana Half a bun Half a bar of chocolate instead of A half loaf of bread A half banana A half bun A half bar of chocolate I feel like the use of “half a” is wrong with these things. … Read more

How do I ask this? [duplicate]

This question already has answers here: How can I ask a person in which order in his family among the siblings? (4 answers) Closed last year. Is there a specific phrase I can use to ask someone: What their “rank” amongst their siblings is? To know whether they are the youngest,middle or oldest sibling? Answer … Read more

what is the defference between ‘I don’t have anything’ and ‘I have nothing’

I don’t have anything. I have nothing. What is the differnece between them? I wanna know the nuance, because to me they just look the same. Answer They mean the same. The usual phrasing is “I don’t have anything.” You might use “I have nothing” to be more emphatic or to add variation to your … Read more