Commas in an Article [closed]

I just read this article and have a few questions regarding it.

I’ll just quote the “Rooms are more expensive in the morning” section:

If you ring up in the morning for a room that night you will pay more
than earlier you enquire.

If you try around 5pm or 6pm you may have a chance at a cheaper
night’s stay.

This is because around this time, all no-show reservations that were
secured by credit cards are freed up, creating a vacancy in the hotel.

In busy cities such as New York or Chicago this time can be even
earlier.

However if you leave it too late, such as around 9pm or 10pm they
hotel may rack up the price as they know your options are limited.
Timing is key.

  1. Why isn’t there a comma after “that night” in the first paragraph?
  2. Shouldn’t it be “the earlier” instead of “than earlier”?
  3. Do people in GB really use the word “enquire” instead of “inquire”?
  4. In the second paragraph, shouldn’t there be a comma after “If you try around 5pm or 6pm”?
  5. What is a “no-show reservation”? (I never booked a hotel room in my life and can’t seem to find out what that term means.)
  6. In the 4th paragraph, shouldn’t there be a comma after “Chicago”?
  7. In the 5th paragraph, shouldn’t there be a comma after “However”?
  8. Is “to leave it too late” a correct expression? (There is an expression with a similar meaning in my native language but I didn’t know there is an English equivalent. I just want to be sure it’s a correct expression before using it.)

Answer

Bear in mind that while commas are convenient they’re not always required. All of these sentences could benefit from additional punctuation, and I don’t know why the author chose not to use them. Maybe he was bitten by a comma as a small child?

  1. There should be lots of commas. Here’s how I would write these sentences:

If you ring up in the morning, for a room that night, you will pay more the earlier you enquire.

If you try around 5pm or 6pm, you may have a chance at a cheaper night’s stay.

This is because, around this time, all no-show reservations (that were secured by credit cards) are freed up, creating a vacancy in the hotel.

In busy cities, such as New York or Chicago, this time can be even earlier.

However, if you leave it too late (such as around 9pm or 10pm), the hotel may rack up the price as they know your options are limited. Timing is key.

  1. Yes it should be “the”.

  2. I assume they do. It’s a fine word. Recall in GB they speak actual English, whereas in America we just use a rough approximation.

  3. Yes, see above.

  4. No-show reservation means someone made a reservation but didn’t show up at the expected time, or by a deadline.

  5. & 7. See above

  6. It’s a valid idiom. “I meant to sign up for this dance class that starts the beginning of each month, but I left it too late.”

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : UTF-8 , Answer Author : Andrew

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