common plural noun [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct?

The Italian was furious after the Turin giants were dumped out of the Champions League last season by a late Real Madrid penalty.

As I’ve been taught it should be incorrect because if we use ‘the’ before an adjective then that whole entity is a common plural noun, e.g. The French (French people), The poor (poor people) etc. so according to this logic we should use ‘were’ instead of ‘was’ with ‘The Italian’. Am I right?

Answer

You need more context to the quote:

“The decision to bring forward its use follows lobbying from top clubs including Juventus, whose chairman, Andrea Agnelli, is also president of the powerful European Club Association (ECA), a union of the continent’s biggest teams.

The Italian was furious after the Turin giants were dumped out of the Champions League last season by a late Real Madrid penalty.”

so “The Italian” is a reference to one person (Andrea Agnelli), not a nation and hence the grammar is correct

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Shashwat Choudhary , Answer Author : Daniel Roseman

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