Counting state of an object or person

Is it natural to use an article to specify the state of an object or person? Or alternatively, is this structure not suitable?

For example, see the following sentence.

An unconscious Michael Jackson was rushed to UCLA Medical Center on Thursday afternoon by paramedics who performed C.P.R., according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

from EthiopeanReview.

As a writer for whom English is a second language, I feel a little worried about the start of the sentence. It does not feel natural.

possible revision : Michael Jackson in an unconscious state, was rushed to UCLA Medical Center on Thursday afternoon by paramedics who performed C.P.R., according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Answer

This may look a little strange – and maybe it is by grammar rules – but it is absolutely normal in native English.

Equally weirdly the definite article is just as acceptable and means exactly the same.

If you don’t want to write it like that there are plenty of alternatives. The one you gave, plus:

Michael Jackson, unconscious, was rushed…

Michael Jackson was rushed unconscious…

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : ankit7540 , Answer Author : DJClayworth

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