does “have a go on them” mean “try them” in the following sentence?

Ok, see this sentence

He travels to holiday resorts which have water-slides, has a go on them
and reports back to the travel company where he works.

I would say the phrase “has a go on them” in that sentence could have literal meaning “slide down on water-slides” or a figurative meaning “try them

does “have a go on them” mean “try them” in that sentence?

Answer

To have a go means “to try something” in order to experience it.

We can have a go at some activity.

Would you like to have a go at this new video game?

The doctor in training had a go at suturing a surgical incision.

But since here the activity involves riding a slide, the preposition chosen by the speaker is on.

Would you like to have a go on the new horse? It’s not quite tame yet.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Tom , Answer Author : Tᴚoɯɐuo

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