Grammar matters – explanation of example

I just stumbled over this from http://braythwayt.com/2015/05/04/grammar-matters.html :

  • "I’d like to thank the employees of FormerCo, who made me feel that my contribution mattered."

  • "I’d like to thank the employees of FormerCo who made me feel that my contribution mattered."

One is a lovely tribute to a good company’s people. The other is a passive-aggressive criticism of a flawed company’s toxic culture.

Grammar. Matters.

I am not an English native speaker and I do not get how that comma would discriminate a passive-aggressive tweet from a employee-praising tweet.

Can somebody explain?

Answer

It’s a bit of a stretch, but I can see the point.

I’d like to thank the employees of FormerCo, who made me feel that my contribution mattered.

With the comma, the second clause applies to all the employees of FormerCo, implying that they’re all good people.

I’d like to thank the employees of FormerCo who made me feel that my contribution mattered.

Without the comma, the second clause implies that only some of the employees of FormerCo had this effect and that most (or at least some) of them did not.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : wirrbel , Answer Author : Paul Rowe

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