“He had been raised a brave man… whom only a native woman made a good wife.”

“Her only son had been raised a brave and respected gentleman in their community, whom only a native woman could make a good wife.”

Please, could anyone tell me if this sentence is properly formulated?

My concerns are directed towards the “had been raised a brave and respected gentleman” more exactly the “raised a” part. Shall it be rather… “raised as a” or “raised into a“.

As well, the formulation “only a native woman could make him a good wife” can it be rephrased in the above mentioned form, using whom (obviously for stylistic reasons and also for joining two sentences)?

Answer

This sentence is leaving out a couple of prepositions that are understood. The first one you have found on your own: raised as a (we wouldn’t use into; we would say grown into a, though). The other one is for, as in for whom only.

So:

Her only son had been raised as a brave and respected gentleman in their community, for whom only a native woman could make a good wife.

If you want to use him you should break it into two complete sentences, so:

Her only son had been raised as a brave and respected gentleman in their community, and only a native woman could make him a good wife.

This works, but it is a bit ambiguous: it could mean that only a native woman could make him into a good wife! So, this is a bit clearer:

Her only son had been raised as a brave and respected gentleman in their community, and only a native woman could make a good wife for him.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Community , Answer Author : BobRodes

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