He ripped out a fathom and a half o’ brimstone Spanish This is from the note of Kipling Society

‘”You told me to bring cannon-shot next time, an’ I’ve brought ’em.”

‘He saw we had. He ripped out a fathom and a half o’ brimstone
Spanish
, and he swung down on our rail, and he kissed me before all
his fine young captains. His men was swarming out of the lower ports
ready to unload us. When he saw how I’d considered all his likely
wants, he kissed me again.

This is from “Simple Simon” in “Rewards and Fairies” by Kipling.

I do not understand the meaning of this.

He ripped out a fathom and a half o’ brimstone Spanish

This is from the note of Kipling Society.
[Page 300, line 4] brimstone Spanish Brimstone is sulphur. In this context, ‘fiery’, or ‘burning’. The reader can assume that Drake was swearing exuberantly in Spanish.

I am so glad if somebody kindly teach me.

Answer

One of the meanings for “Ripped out” is “burst out with a violent or profane utterance” (quoting after https://www.thefreedictionary.com/rip+out).

“A fathom and a half” is an unit of measurement (equivalent to about 2.7 meters), in this case meaning something like “a lot”.

The word “brimstone” modifies “Spanish”. Brimstone is the alternative name for sulfur, an element associated with fire and heat. Thus, “brimstone Spanish” can be understood as “fiery (= aggressive, passionate) Spanish”.

In total, the whole sentence is a colorful metaphor which can be interpreted as “he said a lot of violent, passionate things in Spanish,” or — as the note from Kipling Society remarks — Drake started “swearing exuberantly in Spanish”.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Hiroshi Inagaki , Answer Author : J. D.

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