Him, he, his confusing references

I’m trying to understand this song, but it’s really full of non usual constructions to me.

Her words like the mountain stood lonely and lofty
With her face like a daydream and her hair like the shawl
Worn by a mourner as he steals away softly
From those that would have him mourn nothing at all

Endlessly sorrow rode high on the north wind
Slashing and slicing, to take him his toll
And endlessly creatures of darkness were cutting
Their paths through the walls that sheltered the soul

But no longer gypsy-like sadness unending
Her eyes they lay hollow and her face petrified
Some will go laughing and others condemning
But who there among you could have told her goodbye

Does “As he steals” refer to the mourner?
Does him in “take him his toll” refer to the wind?
If yes, is this a example of personification, using him instead of it?

What does “Endlessly sorrow rode high on the north wind Slashing and slicing to take him his toll” mean?

Disconsidering the metaphors, the endlessly sorrow used the north wind like
a tool?
I can’t understand the specific meaning of “take him his tool”.

Answer

Does “As he steals” refer to the mourner?

Yes. To steal away is to leave without being seen. (Like a thief, I guess.)

Does him in “take him his toll” refer to the wind?

No. “Him” refers to sorrow, and it is a personification. Sometimes a pronoun is used after the verb to emphasize who’s doing the action. This doesn’t change the meaning of the sentence. It’s unusual in everyday speech, though. It sounds a bit archaic, but can also sound uncultured — like something you’d hear out in the country. It depends on the context. The author probably just needed an extra syllable in that line.

What does “Endlessly sorrow rode high on the north wind Slashing and slicing to take him his toll” mean?

It’s a chain of metaphors. The singer is describing emotional pain in terms of physical destruction. Sorrow (personified) is riding the north wind like a horse. The north wind is cold. Cold wind is often described as “cutting” or “piercing”, like something sharp. Sorrow is taking a toll, which is a payment for passage. Instead of money, sorrow is cutting pieces off of the singer. Note that the next line is about “cutting” through walls that “sheltered the soul”. The singer is cold (emotionally), lonely, and losing himself.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Apprentice , Answer Author : Adam Haun

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