“I have a grievance (from you that)…” – Is ‘from you that’ redundant?

Suppose two close friends are talking about a problems which recently has occurred between them; then does the bold segment in the sentence bellow seem redundant to you or not:

I have a grievance from you that I need to air with you.

Answer

I have a grievance from you that I need to air with you.

Since you’re not asking for the phrase appropriate in the situation, this sentence, taken alone, doesn’t make sense to me.

To air one’s grievances is an idiom, which means “to complain; to make a public complaint”, and as such, it may be followed by the preposition either against (someone) or about/over (something).

“I have my grievances against you to air” doesn’t match your situation at all. Or does it?

On thinking twice, I’d sooner say it does because in many cases the expression carries along with it a good-natured touch of satire, even parody.

Collocations for the noun grievance see here.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : A-friend , Answer Author : Victor B.

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