I’m having trouble with a compound verb phrase (unsure if that’s the correct terminology)

I’m having some trouble getting the following sentence to be grammatically correct:

This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, or for an athlete, sport.

My particular concern is with ending the sentence with just "sport." I’m not sure of what the rules are for this kind of sentence, or what this sort of sentence is even called. I considered the following:

  • This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, or for an athlete, their sport.
  • This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, or for an athlete, to their sport.
  • This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, or for an athlete, return to their sport.
  • This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, or for an athlete, playing their sport.

Any help on this is appreciated!

Answer

Firstly, the reading of those sentences gives the impression that an athlete is not a person and that should be made good by adding "in particular" or some such device.

Secondly, there is some awkwardness in all constructions in reason of a lack of parallelism.

Taking these remarks into account I’d write the sentence as follows.

  • This is so a person may return to performing everyday tasks, and in particular for an athlete, to playing their sport.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : DG1990 , Answer Author : LPH

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