Is there such a thing as a future infinitive in English?

I am currently working on the English idiomatic phrase "Someone is said (to do/to be doing/to have done) something," and, try as I might, I cannot find any worthwhile piece of information about the question I am asking myself.

Provided that…

  • "It is said that John is a spy." becomes "John is said to be a spy." (Simple Infinitive)
  • "It is said that John is having an affair." becomes "John is said to be having an affair." (Continuous Infinitive)
  • "It is said that John spent some time in jail." becomes "John is said to have spent some time in jail." (Perfect Infinitive)

what, then, does "It is said that John will leave for good." become? Is there anything in English like a future infinitive?

John is said to be to leave for good. (?)

Answer

In tenses where we can’t use auxiliary verbs, will is replaced by going to:

John is said to be going to leave for good.

However, most of the time we’d just use the present continuous, even though it’s a future event:

John is said to be leaving for good.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : user58319 , Answer Author : Peter Shor

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