“Me knowing that he was… ” Is “me” the subject?

“That was it,” he told me. “Laughing at me behind their faces, about a
woman. Me knowing that he was up there, and them knowing I knew that
if I busted in and dragged him out and bashed his head off, I’d not
only be cashiered, I’d be clinked for life for having infringed the
articles of alliance by invading foreign property without warrant or
something.”

What is the subject of the sentence starting “Me knowing”? Is this grammatically correct? If it is, why?

It is from “All the Dead Pilots” by William Faulkner.

Answer

The ‘sentence’ you asked about has no overall subject. It’s an example of artistic license where the rules of grammar get broken, not due to grammatical incompetence, but for some literary reason, typically resulting in fragments of a sentence being used, as your quote demonstrates.

The result here is that the sequence you asked about is not actually a full sentence, but a coordination of two non-finite clauses:

  1. Me knowing that he was up there.
  2. Them knowing I knew that if I busted in and dragged him out and bashed his head off, I’d not only be cashiered, I’d be clinked for life for having infringed the articles of alliance by invading foreign property without warrant or something.

Because there is no main clause, there is no overall grammatical subject.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : learn_92 , Answer Author : Cerberus_Reinstate_Monica

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