Meaning and usage of “as well as”

We use “as well as” to mean “and in addition”, “and also”, but the following sentence completely made me confused:

There are roughly 1000 different words for “water,” as well as for “louse”.

I know that above mentioned sentence should mean that “there are roughly 1000 different words for “water,” and also for “louse”.

Doesn’t that mean that there are individually 1000 words for “water” and another 1000 words for “louse”? If so, then we have 2000 words. Please correct me if I am asking wrong.

Answer

Yes, it means that there are 1000 words each for “water” and “louse”, for a total of roughly 2000 words. Consider it this way:

There are roughly 1000 different words for “water,” as well as [1000 words] for “louse”.

The original version is simply a shortcut.

By the way, in math, this would be the distributive property:

1000 words (water + louse) = 1000 words (water) + 1000 words (louse)

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Ahmed , Answer Author : Roger Sinasohn

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