“No less than” when referring to non-quantities

I came across this answer to the question “Which of the following best summarizes the main points of the argument?” In an LSAT practice test:

Balanced reporting requires impartially revealing injustices where they occur no less than fairly presenting the views of each party in a conflict.

I am having moderate difficulty parsing this sentence. Before the “no less than” the sentence is a pretty clear declaration. After the “no less than” the sentence is a readable sentence fragment. But it isn’t really a quantity, so I am having trouble understanding the meaning of the entire sentence.

If it instead said:

Balanced reporting requires impartially revealing injustices where they occur no less than 5 times in a given week.

Even though this thought, guideline, or rubric might be questionable, the sentence itself makes sense.

So what is the meaning of the sentence in question?

Answer

No less than applies to numbers, but it also means equally. as in no more, no less. Your example

Balanced reporting requires impartially revealing injustices where they occur no less than fairly presenting the views of each party in a conflict.

can be rewritten:

Balanced reporting equally requires impartiality (revealing injustices where they occur) and fairness (in presenting the views of each party in a conflict).

or

Balanced reporting requires impartiality no less than fairness.

The assumption is that fairness is presumed to be necessary to balanced reporting, but also impartiality no less than fairness.

At this juncture we need understanding no less than force, and wisdom no less than clear goals. – Bangor Daily news, 2004

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : GuestGuestGuest , Answer Author : anongoodnurse

Leave a Comment