“No point in” vs. “no point of” vs. “no point to”

Point in, point of, point to. (Point in the sense of “purpose”.) What are the differences among these — in meaning? in usage (each is used in certain constructions or with certain collocates, say)? in dialect? in register? etc.

Some examples (though I’m asking more generally than just about these examples):

(1a) There’s no point in going.
(1b) There’s no point of going.
(1c) There’s no point to going.

(2a) Is there a point in his action?
(2b) Is there a point of his action?
(2c) Is there a point to his action?

(3a) What’s the point in that sculpture’s being there?
(3b) What’s the point of that sculpture’s being there?
(3c) What’s the point to that sculpture’s being there?

Answer

There’s no “rule” here – just established idiomatic norms.

1a – There’s no point in going. (most common)
1b – There’s no point of going. (non-standard)
1c – There’s no point to going. (sometimes acceptable)

2a – Is there a point in his action? (often acceptable)
2b – Is there a point of his action? (non-standard)
2c – Is there a point to his action? (most common)

3a – What’s the point in that sculpture’s being there? (often acceptable)
3b – What’s the point of that sculpture’s being there? (most common)
3c – What’s the point to that sculpture’s being there? (sometimes acceptable)

(Most speakers would drop the apostrophe+s on the last three.)

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : msh210 , Answer Author : FumbleFingers

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