On the use of “is not so […] but”

Is it proper English to say:

“With method A, the goal is not so to perform task B but (rather) to address problem C.”

Are there other more appropriate/elegant ways to convey the same meaning?

Answer

Use either “not so much” or “not“, but not “not so“.

  1. With A, the goal is not so much X as it is Y.

  2. With A, the goal is not X but Y.

The first means that the goal is more Y than X. The second means that the goal is not at all X; it is instead Y.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Antoine , Answer Author : Drew

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