Participle clauses

I have this participle clause in this sentence:

Having confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness.

I want to rewrite this sentence but I’m considering which one is correct.

  1. He has confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness.
  2. He confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness.
  3. confessing his mistake, he begged for forgiveness.

Thank you very much!

Answer

From the OP’s comment:

I’m learning about participle and I’m confused about “having confessed
his mistake” is in the past or the present. Why it has “having” here.

The original sentence (that does not require rewriting) runs as follows:

Having confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness.

“He deviated from the principles.”

“Do we scold him now?”

“No need.”

“Why is that?”

“He has confessed his mistake.”

That would be the past perfect: an accomplishment in the past that has a direct bearing on the person’s present. Has confessed.

Now if you pick up that past-perfect phrase and turn it into a clause in a compound sentence, it becomes –

“Having confessed his mistake, he …”

That’s all there is to it, really.

Your suggestion, i.e. “Confessing his mistake, he begged for forgiveness” also works, kind of, but is far less precise.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : 19932 gembui , Answer Author : Ricky

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