Positive adverbs for negative verbs?

Some verbs have senses that are somehow positive. For example, consider

protected
sheltered 
supported

And thus the opposites of these verbs has the related negative senses:

unprotected
unsheltered
unsupported

On the other side, some adverbs have senses that are somehow positive. For example, consider:

fully
completely
perfectly

Now, when we use these positive adverbs with those verbs that have the positive senses, it sounds natural:

perfectly protected
fully supported

To the contrary, when we use such positive adverbs for those verbs that have negative senses, it sounds unnatural:

perfectly unprotected
fully unsupported

Is there anything unidiomatic about such usages? And, if so, how do we usually avoid them?What adverb can we use for example for “unprotected” to means “perfectly unprotected”?

Answer

In At Dawn We Slept, Gordon Prange’s definitive work on Pearl Harbor, he has some excellent quotes from military men with strongly expressed opinions.

I recall one of them describing a colleague as perfectly useless. So it’s definitely possible to use these expressions idiomatically, especially in a context where “negative” things like weakness or isolation are seen as desirable by an attacker, or by people whose thoughts run along these lines.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Sasan , Answer Author : Global Charm

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