“Sacrifice” vs. “forgo”: which is better in this sentence?

I want to express a situation to a friend saying the following:

I have received two offers. The first one is of a good salary, but I did not
like the city, while regarding the 2nd offer, it is of a lower salary but
the city is awesome. I do not know whether or not I should sacrifice the
salary for living in a nice city.

I would like to find an alternative word for the word “sacrifice” in the last sentence, and I do not know if my attempt is right or wrong.
My attempt to re-write the last sentence is:

I do not know whether or not I should forgo the salary
for living in a nice city.

Please help me to find the best alternative for the word “sacrifice” in the last sentence.

Answer

Sacrifice and forgo both seem like perfectly good choices.

Trade-off (or tradeoff) would be a good possibility, but the dictionaries I’ve checked define it only as a noun. See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trade-off, http://www.thefreedictionary.com/tradeoff, http://www.dictionary.com/browse/tradeoff?s=t>, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/trade-off?q=tradeoff. Given that, you could use trade off as two separate words:

I don’t know if I should trade off the higher salary for living in
a nicer city.

I don’t know if I should trade off living in a nicer city for the
higher salary.

You could also use compromise or exchange:

I don’t know if I should compromise the higher salary for living
in a nicer city.

I don’t know if I should exchange the higher salary for living in a nicer city.

Of these options, I would go with trade off (which is a slight twist on the suggestion of @KristinaLopez — noun versus verb issue).

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Elpharaoh , Answer Author : Richard Kayser

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