Substance made softer by moisture from humidity

As we were enjoying some peanuts that have been sitting out in the Wisconsin humidity the last several days, this question came to mind:

What do you call a substance (especially a food) that is made softer (less crunchy) after it has taken on moisture from humid air?

The word soft doesn’t capture it – there’s still some crunch. They’re not stale either. Nor is delicious a good choice (my personal opinion). 🙂


Sample sentence: “On a hot, humid summer day at the ballpark, the sun’s heat kept the original roasted crunchiness of our bag of peanuts. The leftovers that sat home in the kitchen through the following cool, humid spell didn’t fair so well; they mostly went _________.”


Disambiguation: I’m specifically looking for what you call the substance after it has taken on the moisture (as compared to the ability of the substance to take on moisture).

Answer

limp

Adj. 1. limp – not firm;

Related:

“wilted lettuce” wilted stale – lacking
freshness, palatability, or showing deterioration from age;

“stale bread”;

“the beer was stale”

(Based on WordNet 3.0)

Usage note: “Limp” is to asparagus as “stale” is to bread and “flat” is to beer. For example, https://www.tasteofhome.com/cooking-tips/vegetables/revive-limp-asparagus explains how to “revive limp asparagus.” But note, I had never seen “limp” used for nuts, only vegetables. But I think it works, and apparently H.E. Bates does too, writing “pineapples, drenched in sticky sweetened tinned milk and sprayed with rather stale limp nuts” in a book called “The Nature of Love.”

On a hot, humid summer day at the ballpark, the sun’s heat kept the original roasted crunchiness of our bag of peanuts. The leftovers that sat home in the kitchen through the following cool, humid spell didn’t fair so well; they mostly went limp.

lose their crunch

Sun Chips Bag to Lose Its Crunch

By Suzanne Vranica

Updated Oct. 6,
2010 12:01 a.m. ET

Frito-Lay, the snack giant owned by PepsiCo Inc., says it is pulling
most of the biodegradable packaging it uses for its Sun Chips snacks,
following an outcry from consumers who complained the new bags were
too noisy.

Touted by Frito-Lay as 100% compostable, the packaging, made from
biodegradable plant material, began hitting store shelves in January.
Sales of the multigrain snack have since tumbled.

On a hot, humid summer day at the ballpark, the sun’s heat kept the original roasted crunchiness of our bag of peanuts. The leftovers that sat home in the kitchen through the following cool, humid spell didn’t fare so well; they mostly lost their crunch.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Edward Brey , Answer Author : Community

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