Is “100% correct pronunciation” an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

If I put "100% correct pronunciation" in the following sentence, is it understandable and correct? "100%" is what I would like to emphasize. If it is not right, how should it be expressed? "It is the 100% correct pronunciation of mischievous you just heard in the video." PS. I looked it up in the Google … Read more

The meaning of “late” in “the late Buddy Holly”

I came across an expression "the late Buddy Holly" and additionally gathered two more examples of it, all of which I don’t understand. The rock ‘n roll revival has provoked the Record Industry Assn. of America to award two records by the late Buddy Holly for Gold Records. Here’s one of two previously unreleased sides … Read more

A noun before an adjective without a verb

The children surrounded the new writer, their eyes and mouths wide open Why this sentece is correct? As far as I know "open" has an adjective phrase functioning. So, shouldn’t we write something like …, their eyes and mouths were wide open. or …, with their wide open eyes and mouths. Must not an adjective … Read more

“a lump the size of a golf ball” or “of the size” or “a golf-ball-sized lump”?

Which one of them is grammatically correct? a lump the size of a golf ball a lump of the size of a golf ball a golf-ball-sized lump Which one of them is used more in daily language specifically in UK ? Answer All three choices are grammatical although I’m unsure about the hyphenation in 3. … Read more

oneself + gerund

The U.S. Postal Service, itself teetering on the brink of insolvency, is ill equipped to handle the surge. Why not “its teetering on the brink of insolvency or it teetering on the brink of insolvency?” I’d like to know how the grammar works and how to apply it appropriately. Thanks a lot! Answer Possessive pronouns … Read more

Question about reduced relative clauses: Can “having…” mean both “which had… ” and “which have…”?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered incapable of discerning truth for themselves. (2) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women who had … Read more

‘prevent from willing participating’ or ‘prevent from willingly participating’?

‘prevent from willing participating’ or ‘prevent from willingly participating’? For example: His active vocabulary is rather limited, but this doesn’t prevent him from willingly participating in class activities. Answer You want the adverb (=willingly) and not the adjective (=willing) to modify the verb "participating". Therefore, you should say … willingly participating … Edit: What is … Read more

Parallelizable vs. Parallelable

Which sentence is correct and meaningful? The following computer algorithm is highly parallelizable. The following computer algorithm is highly parallelable. Answer According to this Google Ngram It seems like parallelizable is far more common, so I believe parallelizable should be preferred over parallelable. AttributionSource : Link , Question Author : If_You_Say_So , Answer Author : … Read more

What is the adjective/phrase that best describes an inconsistent/irregular weekly earnings pattern?

This is a word- or phrase-request question. Question: What is the pair of adjectives that best describe a [consistent/regular] weekly earnings pattern and an [inconsistent/irregular] weekly earnings pattern? Context/Details: There are two unemployed workers: Worker A earned $500 every week prior to layoff. Worker B had varying weekly earnings (e.g., week1=$500, week2=$350, week3=$0, week4=$700). This … Read more