Most expensive design Vs Most recent design

In the past, making structures quake-resistant meant firm yet flexible materials, such as steel and wood, that bend without breaking. Later, people tried to lift a building off its foundation, and insert rubber and steel between the building and its foundation to reduce the impact of ground vibrations. The most expensive/recent designs give buildings brains … Read more

Meaning of “… how it is that…”?

The original sentence: We set out to explore how it is that we can all live in the same universe yet see reality so differently. The compared sentence: We set out to explore how we can all live in the same universe yet see reality so differently. Source I would like to know the meaning … Read more

“It will take an hour for the room to get/be painted” “It will take the room an hour to get/be painted”

"It will take an hour for the room to get/be painted" "It will take the room an hour to get/be painted" i am thinking if they are grammatically correct sentences. As usually we say "It will take an hour for me to paint the room" and "It will take me an hour to paint the … Read more

Do I have to specify the time when I say “How silly of me!” in the past? (see example)

Do I have to specify the time when I say "How silly of me!" in the past? Let’s say I’m telling a friend about something silly that I did in the past, and I say: How silly of me (it was) not to suspect that! Is "it was" implicit in this case—since my friend understands … Read more

Which one is predicates?

I can think of several examples of where technical teams knew a proposed well would be dry and yet senior management wanted to drill it because of pressure from government or business partners. I would like to know in the above sentence which one is the predicate? The sentence construction makes me confused. "can think … Read more

“They have got water coming up to their knees”. vs “Water comes up to their knees”. Which one is more idiomatic?

A native speaker is telling about the floods, how it happens, how people behave during floods, etc. and she says: They’ve got water coming up to their knees. I know this structure is commonly used when you want to say "you own something", but I find it interesting to see it used for description of … Read more

“There are alot of people who can substitute you”

Is "There are alot of people who can substitute you" equivalent to "There are alot of people who can substitute for you".(People will take your position). I reckon if we use "substitute" without "for" in my given example then it will be wrong and we could only use "replace" without "for" and the right sentence … Read more