“to the day” VS “at this day”

Do the following bold time adverbs mean the same? If yes do they both sound natural to you?

  • The king was crowned 150 years ago to the day.
  • The king was crowned 150 years ago at this day.

My third question is that if it is possible to omit the to be verb ‘was’ from the sentence above without losing any sense or making the sentence seem unidiomatic or strange?

Answer

You could use these sentences:

The king was crowned 150 years ago to the day.
The king was crowned 150 years ago on this day.

These both mean that, on the current date 150 years ago, the king was crowned.

Generally, use on for dates and at for times:

On this day 150 years ago at noon, …
At 17:26 on June the 29th, …


If you removed was from the sentence, it would not sound natural. In fact, it may take on an amusing and very different meaning:

intransitive verb

in childbirth : to appear at the vaginal opening — used of the first part (as the crown of the head) of the infant to appear

an anesthetic was given when the head crowned

Merriam-Webster

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : A-friend , Answer Author : LMS

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