two “will be” in a sentence – “not all the policies that ‘will be’ put in place ‘will be’ favorable”

The company will put in place some policies to cut cost. Nevertheless, not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.

Is the sentence above with two “will be” in one sentence grammatically correct? Does it read awkwardly?

Answer

Nevertheless, not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.

I see nothing wrong with the sentence.

        noun phrase acting as the subject       verb
{--------------------------------------------} {-----}
not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.
{                  } {-----------------------}
{------------------}       relative clause
   ^                                   |
   |___adds specific details to this___|

“All the policies that will be put in place” is a noun phrase. In that noun phrase, “that will be put in place” is a relative clause that adds information to or specify details about “all the policies”. With that said, “all the policies that will be put in place” can be treated as the usual subject in the sentence. “Not” is just there to negate the “all” in “all the policies”.

The 2 will be‘s are used differently here and don’t directly affect each other. There’s no problem with the grammar.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : william007 , Answer Author : John Zhau

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