uncommon use of “as well as” compounding two verbs onto one subject

I’ve got a pretty strong intuition for what’s grammatically correct and what’s not. My hunch here is that the following sentence is wrong. Can someone verify this for me, using a syntactical rule to back it up?

A representative will contact you shortly with your username and password. In the course of this contact they will explain the process of application, as well as answer any other questions you may have.

Answer

This is a perfectly fine construction. “As well as” is a conjunction, and a coordinating one at that. It works just like and.

A representative will contact you shortly with your username and password. In the course of this contact they will [explain the process of application], as well as [answer any other questions you may have].

Here, the conjunction joins the two phrases “explain the process of application“, and “answer any other questions you may have” and gives them the same importance syntactically.

The most important thing to remember is that conjunctions can only join two phrases of the same type. If the two phrases that I bracketed were conjugated differently or had different word class types (one was just a noun, the other an adverb) then it would be incorrect.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : pulverize , Answer Author : Ledda

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