“Unlike many other languages, you cannot [skipped]” – Is it OK to use such a construction? [closed]

I have a text about German language. There is a following sentence:

In German, unlike many other languages, you cannot [skipped].

Is it grammatically correct to omit “In German”?

Unlike many other languages, you cannot [skipped].

I’m not sure the second variant is correct because it looks to me as I’m talking about the language itself (like “Unlike many other languages, German has a very strong emphasis on [skipped]”).

Or maybe the best possible option would be the following one?

Unlike many other languages, you cannot [skipped] in German.

Answer

If the meaning of “other languages” is clear from context, then the second variant is valid, but if there is any possible ambiguity, I’d go with the first or third variants.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : john c. j. , Answer Author : StephenS

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