“Until you apologised” vs. “until you have apologised” vs. “until you apologise”

What is the most correct way of saying to someone that I won’t speak to him before he has apologised.

  1. I won’t speak to you until you have apologised for what you have done.
  2. I won’t speak to you until you apologised for what you have done.
  3. I won’t speak to you until you apologise for what you have done.
  4. I won’t speak to you until you have apologised for what you did.
  5. I won’t speak to you until you apologised for what you did.
  6. I won’t speak to you until you apologise for what you did.

Answer

1, 3, 4, and 6 are all reasonable choices, but of these, 6 is the most common and generally accepted choice. It is the most direct, succinct, and effective way of saying it.

2 and 5 are not acceptable. “Apologised” is not the correct tense to coordinate with “until,” because “until” must refer to something that will occur in the future; “apologised” cannot be in the future (unless it is modified in some way, such as adding “have”).

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : AmauryFrançais , Answer Author : John M. Landsberg

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