Usage and order of “galore”: an adjective, but looks like an adverb

It is common to put adverbs of manner after a direct object. But is it grammatically correct to put an adjective after noun? As in:

  1. Since then there have been reports, inquiries and guidance galore.

Why can’t it be like this, if it’s an adjective modifying a noun:

  1. Since then there have been galore reports, inquiries and guidance.

Also, I am not sure whether this is a postpositive adjective or a reduced phrase adjective.

I have Googled and but couldn’t get the actual answer of it.

Answer

Galore is an interesting word, an example of postpositive adjective.

Usage:

The Irish phrase go lear literally translates as “to sufficiency.” If there are sufficient enough bananas to build a house with them, you’d say that there are bananas galore.

The word is an example of a postpositive adjective, which means it comes after the word it describes. So when you go to a circus and 700 clowns surround you, don’t say “There are galore clowns,” because the correct way to express your terror is this: “There are clowns galore. Help!”

(Vocabulary.com)

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Ahmed , Answer Author : Community

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