Use of “not primarily” in “Saw creating the 7 habits not primarily….”

he saw creating the 7 Habits not primarily as a means of his own success.

In the above mentioned sentence I want to know whether the usage of “not primarily ” is correct or not. Please provide me with a proper explanation. Does “not primarily” come before the gerund or after the object of the gerund?enter image description here

Answer

He saw creating the 7 Habits not primarily as a means to his own success, but as an act of service. [The sentence is referring to the book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People]

In English, you can construct a sentence containing the reason for something by using the the word as in a phrase to mean having the purpose or function of:

  • He did that as a favor to his brother.

That utterance can be put in the negative like this:

  • He did that not as a favor to his brother but as a favor to his father.

It could also be put in the negative like this, in a shorter form:

  • He didn’t do that as a favor to this brother but to his father.

As a means to his own success is an example of a noun phrase using as to mean for the purpose of.

Also, in the sentence above, the noun phrase “as a means to his own success” is preceded by: to see creating the 7 Habits is standard English.

transitive verb + gerund noun = He sees playing tennis as a type of endurance sport. They understand being politically involved as a vital necessity.

The verb see here means: to understand.
Transitive verbs may be followed by gerund nouns.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Ahmed , Answer Author : Lambie

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