What does time and attention mean?

What does time and attention mean?

I heard time and attention from a fitness class, the instructor often used time and attention while he was explaining how to barbell row, such as:

“If you guys want to increase your time and attention,…”

Does it mean if I want to increase my endurance and concentration?

A minute ago, I’ve just played back the record file that I recorded during the fitness class in order to recall what exactly he was saying in the class, and here is what he actually said:

If you choose to incorporate more of the Eccentric movement in barbell row, you are increasing time and attention which will reap larger muscle gains. So, rather than just dropping the weights back down on the floor I would suggest slowly lowering the barbell and letting the weights gently touch the ground. If you want even more time and attention, picked up about an inch off the floor and never let it touch the ground.

Answer

English has a lot of paired words (often alliterative) that get used in a variety of contexts. For example, something that is neat and tidy might be spick and span, and if we’re talking about how someone invested everything they had, we might say he invested the whole kit and caboodle.

The words time and attention are often paired together, and talk about how we should not neglect something. My boss might tell me, “This new project needs your time and attention,” meaning that it should be a top priority for me.

In the context of fitness, time and attention could refer to how I concentrate on a specific muscle group during a workout. If I want “six pack abs,” then I will have to give my abs a lot of time and attention.

So, your instructor said:

If you choose to incorporate more of the eccentric movement in barbell row, you are increasing time and attention which will reap larger muscle gains.

Near as I can tell (disclaimer: I am not a body builder), the instructor is saying that the “eccentric movement” will increase the amount of work that the arm muscles are performing, which will make them more muscular.

As for the other sentence:

If you want even more time and attention, picked up pick it up about an inch off the floor and never let it touch the ground.

I’m guessing that he said “pick it up,” not “picked up” (those two sound very similar), and I believe he is explaining how this particular exercise will give even more time and attention to this muscle group.


I did some Google searches to see if I’m at least on the right track, and I found some reassuring sentences from fitness instructors and bloggers. For example, fitness writer Jamie Easton wrote:

I’ve decided to build through the total 12 weeks because legs and glutes really need a lot of time and attention.

Another blogger from Nebraska wrote:

The more time and attention you give to your flexibility training, the more benefits you’ll experience.

Another workout site was explaining the benefits of split (as opposed to full-body) workouts:

Split workouts are great for correcting muscle imbalance: Lagging body parts need time and attention to be brought up to par. With a single muscle group split you can pour your focus and energy into developing that muscle.

Another website explained:

Pressing movements, in particular those involving the chest, are notorious for receiving too much time and attention, whereas back exercises are often neglected.


So, in the context of gym workouts, it looks like we can devote time and attention to a particular muscle group if we would like to build up those muscles – I think that’s what your instructor was trying to say:

…you are increasing time and attention [to the muscles being exercised] which will reap larger muscle gains.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : SAO , Answer Author : J.R.

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