What’s the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?

What’s the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”? I’ve heard both, but have never been able to figure out the difference.

Answer

I would suggest that ‘frighten’ is more intense than ‘scare’. Although they are (very) similar, being scared is less serious than being frightened. That is definitely a second-order effect though; to a first approximation, they are (almost) equivalent.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : brilliant , Answer Author : Jonathan Leffler

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