“Xs are those who are Y.” vs “Xs are Y”

I read the following sentence from an LSAT:

"Animated films appropriate for children are those that are innocently naive, mischievous perhaps, but not threatening."

Would you kindly help explain what’s the usage of this type of sentence construction, especially about the addition of "those that"?

It seems to me that the above almost says the same thing as the below:

Animated films appropriate for children are innocently naive, mischievous perhaps, but not threatening.

I would be very thankful for your help and time!

Answer

They are similar.

If someone asked you, "Which animated films are appropriate for children?" you might say, "Those that are innocently naive, mischievous perhaps, but not threatening." ‘Which‘ requests a subset and LSAT’s sentence uses ‘those‘ to delineate one.

If you were asked to describe animated films that are appropriate for children, you might say, "They’re innocently naive, mischievous perhaps, but not threatening." The category (child-friendly animations) has already been defined.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Lenny , Answer Author : Old Brixtonian

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